Kejimkujik National Park Management Plan presented in Canada’s Parliament

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Parks Canada, the national agency responsible for preserving and promoting Canada’s national parks, has recently tabled a new management plan for Kejimkujik National Park and National Historic Site in Nova Scotia, according to a news release.

The management plan, which is reviewed every ten years, is a requirement under the Canada National Parks Act and serves as a guide for the management of national historic sites, national parks, and national marine conservation areas.

The updated plan for Kejimkujik National Park and National Historic Site focuses on four key strategies, which reflect four key Mi’kmaw worldview concepts. 

The first strategy, Kepmite’tmek (“We respect”), emphasizes the importance of protecting the treasured and changing landscape of the park. The second strategy, Netukulu’ltiek (“We Share Stewardship”), aims to promote sustainability through collective participation and responsibility. 

The third strategy, Msit Ki’kamunaq (“All of Our Relations”), aims to connect visitors with the place and foster a deeper understanding and appreciation of the park’s natural and cultural heritage. The fourth strategy, Toqi’maliaptme’k (“We Cooperate and Collaborate”), promotes co-creation and co-management in order to achieve tangible results.

The Minister of Environment and Climate Change and Minister responsible for Parks Canada, Steven Guilbeault, said national historic sites, national parks, and national marine conservation areas belong to all Canadians and are places where people can connect with history and nature. 

He also expressed gratitude for the collaborative effort in creating the management plan for Kejimkujik National Park and National Historic Site and ensured that the plan would help shape the future of the treasured place.

The management plan is a reflection of Parks Canada’s commitment to working cooperatively with the Mi’kmaq of Nova Scotia and ensuring a shared approach to the management of Kejimkujik. 

The significance of the park to the Mi’kmaq as a cultural landscape is a fundamental aspect of the management direction for the site.

The plan lays out a vision for all elements of the management of Kejimkujik, with examples of actions ranging from climate change mitigation to collaborative archaeology, species at risk recovery, greening operations, and strategic partnering. 

It envisions a future where all visitors have opportunities to develop personal connections to Kejimkujik and where visitors with diverse abilities, needs, and social identities find welcoming and inclusive service at Kejimkuj

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